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44 Inch Chest

44 Inch Chest

2009
Drama
Crime
1h 35m
After his wife, Liz (Joanne Whalley), cheats on him, gangster Colin Diamond (Ray Winstone) gets his revenge by enlisting his underworld pals to kidnap her hunky French lover (Melvil Poupaud) in the feature debut of director Malcolm Venville. Top British actors including Ian McShane, John Hurt and Tom Wilkinson round out the cast of the crime thriller, penned by the screenwriters of another memorable Winstone vehicle, Sexy Beast.
Your probable score
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44 Inch Chest

2009
Drama
Crime
1h 35m
Your probable score
Avg Percentile 36.64% from 174 total ratings

Ratings & Reviews

(174)
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Rated 05 Feb 2010
44
18th
Ray Winstone is great as always, and the supporting cast is good as well. But although there are a few great moments, overall the film is too uneven and pointless to really be engaging.
Rated 02 May 2010
45
46th
Worth a watch
Rated 20 Jul 2010
67
73rd
A complete mess besides the acting. McShane as usual steals the whole thing.
Rated 23 Apr 2010
45
32nd
Many actors i like but the movie was pointless. what a waste of all this talent. i had high hopes and was very disappointed.
Rated 16 Aug 2023
7
62nd
44 inch chest is 90 percent monologues, by people who know how to do it. The women don't get to say much. But I like that it's just people acting, on a minimal set. You could have shot this for a thousand dollars, plus what the actors make.
Rated 15 Oct 2011
70
58th
A very good debut film. With its single main set and small cast, it could have easily suffered from its structure, but becomes a fascinating character drama which starts with a crime story and becomes a fascinating take on love and, more importantly, male emotions. The cast (Winstone, McShane, Hurt, Wilkinson, Dillane, Whalley etc.) is on form and the script, by the writers of Sexy Beast, is exceptional. Some may take issue with its second half but I loved this immensely.
Rated 03 Sep 2010
28
91st
This is a small film almost entirely filmed in one room. It has a power cast of British actors that push this rich satyr to the top.
Rated 31 Aug 2010
7
76th
I'm baffled how such an empty movie can be so engaging. The best part - in perspective Winstone's role appears to be written in a way, which makes it is almost impossible to pull off. Terrific cast, amazing lighting and great sound design.
Rated 18 May 2010
84
69th
John Hurt and Ian McShane were quite entertaining here. The film meanders a bit and leaves you feeling somewhat flat at the finish.
Rated 31 Oct 2010
37
52nd
Surprisingly good, and easy to film.
Rated 15 Nov 2010
70
37th
Very well-acted drama which starts off exceptionally well (highlighted by Hurt and McShane's profane sparring) but completely runs aground in the second half (and wastes the great Tom Wilkinson). If it had continued in the vein of the first half it could have been great, but the second half becomes far too sluggish and self-serious, trying for a profundity that just doesn't exist in the relationship between Winstone and Whalley. Worthwhile for Hurt and McShane who have rarely been better.
Rated 02 Dec 2010
15
21st
"This limp psychodrama proves woefully short on character development or narrative structure." - Nick Schager
Rated 30 Jun 2011
80
57th
Four Titans of acting give their all to a very unsubtle film, which would have been much better off as a theater production. Ian McShane is marvelous as Meredith and, honestly, I'd watch him deliver monologues all day, no matter how shoehorned in they felt.
Rated 15 Jul 2010
55
7th
With such a fantastic collection of British talent there was no doubt the acting would be of the highest quality and for a while that is enough to maintain a level of intrigue until it becomes clear that it is going absolutely nowhere. There is just about enough material to fill a short film but nowhere close for a feature length.
Rated 09 Feb 2012
50
35th
Expected more from this but worth a watch nonetheless.
Rated 07 Jul 2012
60
22nd
A drama that I thought would be a comedy, considering who is involved. But it's far too serious, and it's populated by clichéd gangster characters. And halfway through, it takes a weird turn, and never recovers from it, and some of the subject matter is a bit too jarring. What a mess, doesn't compare to Sexy Beast. But John Hurt, Ian McShane, and the fact that Angelo Badalamenti did the music, no matter how forgettable it is, gives it some credit. Not much, though
Rated 16 Aug 2012
57
9th
The acting is good in this movie, it looks like the actors are having a lot of fun. The script starts off well but the story never really goes anywhere. The ending of the movie is unsatisfactory. There is no way I could recommend this movie.
Rated 30 Nov 2012
40
13th
Ultimately, though, even the company of these brilliant actors can't compensate for the limp, shapeless plot. With nowhere to go dramatically, the last third dissolves into a haze of flashbacks and fantasy sequences.
Rated 07 Dec 2013
53
16th
Theatrical, absolutely, but ultimately too meandering to be truly enjoyable. McShane, as per usual, is dominant.
Rated 18 Mar 2014
4
22nd
44 Inch Chest sells itself with the stellar cast alone, but otherwise this is a disappointing and underwhelming experience. I expected it to be a black comedy, but it takes itself far too seriously as a directionless gangster drama. Winstone, Hurt, McShane, Wilkinson & Dillane collectively carry the film as best they can and between them they have some great dialogue. But considering this was written by Louis Mellis who previously wrote 'Sexy Beast', I expected so much more. Forgettable.
Rated 26 Jun 2014
80
77th
Fantastic acting and an incredibly original script from the same writing pair as the excellent Sexy Beast, even featuring some of the same cast members. This is one of those films that I seem to like a good more than most people. Exceptionally well written.
Rated 13 Aug 2014
65
8th
These guys aren't gangsters as much as they take on the shell of cinematic gangster persona. Winstone's dilemma functions as a reason to get all these hambones into a room so they can add gusto to their dialogue by means of profanity with thick Cockney accents. And Malcolm Venville, the director, seems more in love with the stylistic exercise he gets in contriving music and montage out of the crevices of a chamber play than he does in elucidating or providing a bedrock for his characters.

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