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Sando-me no satsujin
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Sando-me-no-satsujin
Sando-me-no-satsujin

Sando-me no satsujin

2017
Drama, Suspense/Thriller
2h 4m
Shigemori (Masaharu Fukuyama) is an elite lawyer. He is compelled to defend Mikuma's (Koji Yakusho) murder case. Mikuma has a criminal record from a murder that took place 30 years ago. Mikuma also confesses to the murder charge and he faces the death sentence, but Shigemori begins to have doubts about Mikuma's guilt. (AsianWiki)
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Rated
50th
55
Different Kore-eda film: cold legal suspense instead of warm drama. It's not very successful as a thriller; it's too slow and heavy on dialogue, but it raises questions and it's focus on death penalty must make it heavier viewing for Japanese audiences. It's ambiguity must be frustrating to many, but it lingered in my mind and I could see myself watching it again, even though it's clearly not one of his best. Leads were very good, especially Kôji Yakusho has a strong presence.
Rated
74th
4
It's true that this is not typical form of Kore-eda: the subject matter is grim, humorless, and shot in cold neutral colors. But it is measured, soft-spoken, and lucid in the ways we expect from him, offering quite a bit of thematic consideration: the ethics of criminal defense, the morality of judgment, and perhaps most admissible, an undercurrent about the misgivings between parents and their children, which is of course this filmmaker's ongoing principle concern.
Rated
46th
69
(this isn't very Koreedaery)
Rated
43rd
74
Quite a departure from Kore-eda's typical work, and he mostly pulls it off. I don't know if the slow pace and the overall ambiguity fully worked for me, I felt my attention drifting a few times.
Rated
93rd
83
An intriguing film that asks the viewer the meaning of guilt while also making them question the reality of the case. This film isn't about "who did it?" So much as it is about "why does it matter?" The film ponders this question in excellent detail, showing shades of Kurosawa's Rashomon. However, I found the dialog overly didactic at times with the assistant character coming off as moronic. Despite the contrived plotting and heavy-handed metaphors, I quite like this and the themes it conveyed.
Avg Percentile 48.30% from 139 total ratings
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Submitted byecrE.C.R. on 09 Aug 2017
Poster supplied byecrE.C.R.
Last modified by:knivesknives on 26 Mar 2019