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The-Tree-of-Life
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The Tree of Life

Ratings and reviews:

The Tree of Life

2011
Drama, Fantasy
2h 19m
Avg Percentile 61.13% from 4922 total ratings
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Rated
12th
1
Such a pretentious and pointless piece of garbage. I think Sean Penn put it best when he said, "I have no idea what I'm doing here or what I'm supposed to add to the context." Nailed it. Malick's movies in the past have been beautiful and had a plot, this one only has one of those things. Malick we get it, you don't have a coherent story to tell, quit showing us pictures of the sun and waterfalls you fat douche. Malick may have entered George Lucas territory, nobody is telling him no anymore.
Rated
99th
95
An original and often mesmerizing coming-of-age ode, providing intimacy and personal perspective. McCracken is brilliant. Malick and Lubezki stunningly let us share his childhood, presenting family dynamics, formative years and the beauty of enjoying everyday life. The setup about ways of living seems reductive initially but they are, I gather, merely ideals thrust upon Jack, serving as a tool for organizing his trip down memory lane. I'll choose the way of grace and forgive the nature sequence.
Rated
6th
55
A-s. Toothbrush. Paint. Peeling. Free. Star implodes. Pimple. Orgasm. Le petit morte of Laserdisc. Sneaker souls gripping the ground holding on for dear life. Masturbation. Mental. Genius. Read into a string of words like you read into the string of images in this film & believe you are internalizing something signifycan't. Stringing images of family, the cosmos, & time together doesn't mean you're saying something important. Avant garde review: haven't seen it. Meditate, ponder us, Jack's off.
Rated
97th
10
I can't remember the time I witnessed that many walkouts, yet a harmless, meditative film such as this should hardly be held responsible for one's selfish demeanour. I was moved, emotionally and in thought, entangled by the film's uncanny ability to restore my general fascination about life, what once was and the unknown future which lies ahead, through one of the most intimately told stories I've seen. This is not a perfect film, yet in the grand scheme of things, it's one to be grateful for.
Rated
70th
7
If modern filmmaking is the art of compromise, someone forgot to tell Terrence Malick. Not satisfied with merely tackling love, war and similar hefty themes, Malick this time goes for life itself with an elliptically, associative and lyrically rather than causally told story about people and the ties between them. It's not so much about the O'Brien family as it's about the idea of family and individual. "The Tree of Life" is equally ambitious and visually breathtaking – and a bit too much.
Rated
94th
85
An unconventional yet simple exercise in the form. Malick makes simple movies, we're just used to complex ones. When the lights go down we expect to have a visualized novel thrown at us, and we're supposed to follow along like stupid little detectives. At its best, TToL is like a home movie, only with insanely high production values. At its worst, it's...too big. Sometimes I just had to laugh at the balls this movie has and what it must be like to wake up in the morning and be Terrence Malick.
Rated
18th
58
No.
Rated
8th
20
The most pretentious drinking game. Sip everytime the sun is shown through the trees.
Rated
99th
97
There is this guy on criticker that has this movie in his Tier 1. My initial reaction was to throw rocks at him. But then I decided that he should be forgiven. And that's how much influence this movie had on me. Mallick's world is full of awe and so should we be.
Rated
99th
100
The story of life. Envisioned as a prayer, told through jaw-dropping poetry and imagery. Nothing like any piece of art you've ever seen - and arguably the most memorable movie of the decade.
Rated
61st
65
Oh, Malick wanted to make a classic, the most important film about all questions of humankind, family, religion, being born, living, dying. But here is the achievement: an exaggerated juxtaposition of spiritual and natural imagery, parenthood and childhood ordinary scenes.
Rated
98th
96
This film embodies beauty. Impressionistic fragments of memory flow into each other, and even when the images aren't gloriously bedazzled with natural light they exhibit a captivating sense of framing and movement. Is it enough for a film to have breathtaking visuals? Well, yes, but that's not all there is to it. You could accuse Malick of being too ambitious here, but I was swept into the poetry and rhythms of the voiceover, the gentle exploration of life, its beginnings, its conflicts.
Rated
97th
100
Elliptical, lyrical, beautifully sincere, and -- in its elevation of the quotidian to the cosmic, primordial, cataclysmic -- stunningly ambitious. This mixing of scale makes it so that the boy's resentment toward the father's ostensible hypocrisies register not only on an intimate, familial level but echo on the Biblical as well: Man's mechanical landscapes represent an effort to outdo the master Creator Himself, an attempt to transgress the boundaries set by the great disciplinarian in the sky.
Rated
99th
100
Rapturous. Profound. Beautiful. I am moved beyond words in ways I cannot explain. Forgive me for these superlative praises. But that's just how I felt after seeing this astonishing cinematic achievement. I can't help it.
Rated
98th
95
A time bending portrayal of a nuclear family dealing with tragedy and their juxtapositional relationship with existence. The film crosses aeons of time to contemplate the cosmos and human life's infinitesimal role. Interconnected lives are glimpsed backwards and forwards as nostalgic moments which appear as concurrent hanging fragments in time and space. The film is told with poetic imagery with the complex mournful and joyful narrated emotions of the lives we witness. Abstract but beautiful.
Rated
98th
6
Conveys more explicitly, autobiographically, and audaciously than ever before one of the primary thrusts of Malick's body of work: "The child is the father of the man." Always obsessed with how the memories of formative moments can ripple out over the course of decades, he now reaches back through time and towards the stars as well, to make one family's quotidian conflicts feel both like a drop in the ocean and the ocean itself.
Rated
97th
95
This is one of those films that makes you lose all sense of time, and feels more real than the world outside the theater. Critics have accused Malick of trying to accomplish too much, and not quite getting there, yet I never once felt him trying to influence the viewer, or to make a direct statement. I felt instead like a participant, and that what this film accomplishes will come from within you, from the ways that you manage to connect this story to your own life.
Rated
40th
65
Watching this movie I couldn't stop thinking: wow, the director is so full of himself. He presents hundreds of images to prove, that the world is oh, so beautiful but we already knew that. And the symbolism for the sake of... symbolism? And the final sequence with reunion of all the characters on the beach! Come on.
Rated
5th
30
Where do I start? It's a visually stunning movie, maybe the most beautiful waste of energy I've ever seen. It spends waaay too much time trying (I presume) to tell the storyline with abstract art and random pictures with choral music, but fails miserably in telling a coherent story. The most pretentious crap I've ever seen. Acting is great, and like I said, it's all very beautiful, but that's just about the only positive here. Watch some fireworks with soothing music for 2 hours instead.
Rated
30th
55
do you like these weird, artsy perfume-commercials, where someone whispers some incoherent emotional stuff and then there's a panther? wanna see one in feature-film length? then go ahead. more than once i was tempted to turn this off, but i sat through it expecting a revelation of some sort. it leaves abundent room for interpretation, but mostly i didnt care enough to try. according to this, everything can be overcome with love. well, i shall try to love it then...
Rated
97th
100
Watching a Malick film is an acquired taste for filmgoers--which explains why my cinema posted a sign warning patrons of the artistic nature of a Brad Pitt movie. Whereas most movies are akin to airport novels or comic books, Malick makes philosophical poems. His approach is impactful, as even without knowing the character names you can meditate on topics like life, nature, nurture, and your upbringing. This is a deeply spiritual experience that rewards anyone willing to participate in it.
Rated
39th
2
Malick crafts a high quality period drama and a stunning Discovery Channel-documentary, but his attempt to link the two together through cosmic woo-woo is contrived and a bit too on the nose.
Rated
14th
2
Oh really, do you get it? Congratulations. Let's throw a party for you, smart guy! Free clove cigarettes for everyone. Beret, skinny jeans, and/or soul patch required for admittance. Be sure to tell everyone who doesn't want to go that, heh, maybe Transformers 3 is more on their intellectual level, with a prick smirk on your face.
Rated
92nd
90
Really makes you feel insignificant huh? 2001: An Americana Odyssey
Rated
86th
89
A blending of narrative styles that is part "2001" and part "The Fountain," but not quite as bold as either. It's a beautiful film, no doubt, full of dissected American family dynamics (with focus on the father/son relationship). The synthesis of natural science scenes with a thematic overlay of religious prayer is a unique approach to understanding loss and coming to terms with the fact that all is temporary. The ending is a bit heavy-handed but takes nothing from tremendous acting & direction.
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Avg Percentile 61.13% from 4922 total ratings
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