Search found 2 matches: Mario Puzo

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by ShogunRua
Tue May 19, 2015 9:00 am
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Pulp Novels Adapted into Serious Art Films
Replies: 11
Views: 1234

Re: Pulp Novels Adapted into Serious Art Films

Stewball wrote:
ShogunRua wrote:The former is simply much deeper, by its very nature, than the latter.


When was the last time you got misty-eyed reading a book, or looking at a sculpture or a painting?


Bad question to ask me, of all people. I've never cried at any book or movie in my life.

However, I have felt equal or greater emotion reading a book than I have watching any movie. Several passages of Norwegian Wood, the ending to Master and Margarita, and even the ending to The Moon is a Harsh Mistress hit depths in a way no film ever really has. Now, there are films that hit comparably impressive depths too, but not in the same manner.

Oh, and many people get emotional looking at a particularly evocative sculpture or painting. Even nowadays.

Stewball wrote:True depth is reached when blinding beauty, poetic justice or a profound undiscovered truth reaches out and grabs you by the throat.


I genuinely feel sorry that you have never experienced this from literature. You have no clue what you're missing out on.

Stewball wrote: I might come closer to thinking of a good book that was made better on screen or stage.


I made a topic about that a few months ago, actually. But this is quite different.

And for the record, I actually prefer The Godfather book by Mario Puzo by a smidge to the two movies by Coppola.
by ShogunRua
Mon May 18, 2015 9:29 pm
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Pulp Novels Adapted into Serious Art Films
Replies: 11
Views: 1234

Pulp Novels Adapted into Serious Art Films

I was recently bemused by this thought. Mario Puzo's The Godfather is an excellent, exciting book, but it's also pure pulp silliness. Its roots are in exciting, fast-paced American crime fiction, with lots of well-rendered sex and violence. Puzo based the character of Don Corleone on his mother. It was meant to be a fun read (which it sure as hell was!), not a serious examination of life or any of its characters.

Yet, the movie is widely considered as a timeless classic speaking to the core of the human condition. Amusingly, this is despite being a slightly simplified version of the book. And I think Coppola's adaptation was magnificent; as good as it could possibly be. Rather, this highlights a fundamental difference between books and films as mediums.

The former is simply much deeper, by its very nature, than the latter.

Focus- What are some other silly/pure entertainment books adapted into serious, well-regarded films?

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