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JakeAesthete

Cinema Addict - 2363 Films Ranked

Member Since: Jun 13, 2008

Location: portland, oregon, USA

Recent Rankings
60 T6 Lancelot du Lac (1974) - Apr 24, 2015
"If nothing else, this at least serves as an interesting companion piece to Rohmer's Perceval. Whereas Rohmer uses Arthurian legend as a jumping-off point for a completely unique and different aesthetic from his typical work, here Bresson is basically just doing an almost archetypal Bresson film... but with armor. It also finds him at his driest, if most stylistically disciplined. The philosophical dialogues between Lancelot and Guienevere are the obvious (admittedly compelling) high points."
44 T5 Stray Dogs (2013) - Apr 22, 2015
"Tsai by Numbers, or The Interminable Pathos of Cabbage."
99 T10 Perceval le Gallois (1978) - Apr 21, 2015
"Ridiculous and sublime and almost singularly unique, not just compared to the rest of Rohmer's oeuvre but to cinema as a whole. To call it an "atypical" Rohmer film would be a nearly absurd understatement, but at the same time (and perhaps just a bit perversely) it might very well be his most singularly impressive (albeit somewhat perplexing) work, and almost certainly his most ambitious, both on a formal level and as the purest expression of the religious philosophies underlying all his films."
95 T10 Le pont des Arts (2004) - Apr 19, 2015
"I guess if it's not baroque, don't fix it?"
62 T7 The End of Summer (1961) - Apr 18, 2015
"Although still, in many ways, essentially indistinguishable from other Ozu films, this might very well be my favorite on a purely aesthetic level (so rigorously concise that he's practically "Bresson with smiling", wherein i think it's crucial to address the blurred distinction between his formal rigor and what often gets confused with cultural "niceness" which remains a barrier for some western viewers like myself. That said Ozu has still yet to move me the way Bresson, at his very best, has.)"
50 T5 Floating Weeds (1959) - Apr 17, 2015
"If i put on my Critical Theory hat for a minute, i could discuss this film's potentially intriguing use of Arashi as a stand-in for traditional patriarchal Japanese society (and granted it is intriguing), or i could admit that, as always, i admire Ozu's aesthetic sensibilities more than i ever actually get out of his movies, emotionally or otherwise. Which is not to say i haven't tried, but i'm still waiting for that 'eureka' moment where it all clicks for me. This is, sad to say, not that film."
97 T10 Ivan the Terrible, Part Two (1958) - Apr 13, 2015
"What i said about part one, except possibly even more so? Although if anything, this feels like nothing so much as an extension of the former (am i the only one who felt like this was actually way too short?) The color sequences are sort of a revelation in and of themselves, and this feels a bit more character-based and dramatically looser than Part One. I can't think of another filmmaker offhand, outside of Malick or maybe Bresson, who can make a dolly-in feel like a phenomenological event."
66 T7 Lost River (2014) - Apr 12, 2015
"Exactly the type of nonsensical, self-indulgent actor-turned-first-time-director vanity project (i think?) everyone should have expected/hoped for. At the same time, it feels like such a perfectly-calibrated composite of dude-bro arthouse favorites (Lynch, Korine, Refn, Noe, a little more Lynch for good measure) that it comes close to feeling like a movie actually happening in a seventeen year old boy's head. Which i think is some kind of silly, vaguely admirable accomplishment in and of itself?"
97 T10 Ivan the Terrible, Part One (1944) - Apr 12, 2015
"I'm not sure that any film has felt more singularly influential on the aesthetic of so many filmmakers that i love (aside from maybe Godard), from Hartley to Maddin to Greenaway... it almost feels like ground zero for the entirety of a particular brand of anti-naturalistic, formalist, stylized cinema (how Stalin was sold on it completely boggles my mind). Also, dare i say it feels more genuinely psychedelic and hallucinatory than any of Jodorowsky's bullshit."
73 T8 La Belle personne (2008) - Apr 09, 2015
"A tad less stylish and distinctive than other Honore films (although to be fair, there is still a gay subplot and one musical sequence), it's still all-around a very solid piece of work. Honore's tendency to be a bit schematic and plotty is certainly in full effect, interestingly used here to almost Rohmer-esque ends. It's probably no truer to my own teenage experiences than a Larry Clark film, but at this point in my life anyway i certainly prefer watching these rich kids' problems."