7 Plus Seven
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7 Plus Seven

1970
Documentary
TV Movie
52m
Director Michael Apted revisits the same group of British-born children after a 7 year wait. The subjects are interviewed as to the changes that have occurred in their lives during the last seven years. (imdb)
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7 Plus Seven

1970
Documentary
TV Movie
52m
Your probable score
Avg Percentile 71.69% from 320 total ratings

Ratings & Reviews

(320)
Compact view
Compact view
Rated 22 Feb 2014
83
95th
Continuing the stories, more interesting as the the children are in their early teens. The little shitty rich kids are the worst.
Rated 21 Dec 2012
75
77th
This includes most of 'Seven Up' - the most important parts, anyway - so you might as well begin here. The keyword is juxtaposition. It's fascinating to compare the subjects, with each other and with themselves 7 years previously.
Rated 06 Nov 2011
69
76th
Oh Suzy, you racist.
Rated 20 Aug 2011
68
32nd
I'm still not terribly impressed, but still hopeful for the later films. There's not a whole lot of progression from the first movie. One of the prissy prep boys is turning into a huge git, it's interesting to hear the three girls compare and contrast their different schools, one kid moved to Australia. But things are pretty much the same. There aren't many surprises here. I suspect that events become more compelling in the next film, as the kids start making more decisions for themselves.
Rated 14 Sep 2010
74
49th
The series is yet to become brilliant at this point because, well, teenagers are usually very boring and here we see these kids are no exception to the rule.
Rated 17 Sep 2023
59
14th
An enormous downgrade over the first edition: The interview questions are hamfisted, the filmmaking itself is poor, and worst, the film doesn't address what it means to be 14, choosing instead to demonstrate how its subjects "show the man" of who they were at 7.
Rated 19 Apr 2020
78
56th
Entertaining catch-up feels more like a middling current affairs segment than a film in of itself, and suffers from too much repetition of SEVEN UP's footage; still these are sparky, charismatic kids and the peek this film provides into 60s styles, society and attitudes is quite interesting and revealing.
Rated 15 May 2019
60
26th
Narrator: "Are you happier now than you were then?"
Rated 19 Apr 2012
77
17th
While in and of itself a very good documentary, it's damaged by the lack of change which surrounds most of the children. While the difference between 7 and 14 is vast at the time, even the film seems to recognize that most of the children have followed along very predictable paths, with the exception of one moving to Australia. 7 is more interesting as a snapshot into 60s Britain, and the participants come into their own in 21 Up! This is perhaps one that could be missed if need be.
Rated 18 Feb 2008
85
75th
A nice follow-up to 7 Up. The kids are now 14 and have minds of their own. This whole series is very addicting.
Rated 22 Feb 2015
65
83rd
x2
Rated 19 Feb 2011
80
95th
Amazing.
Rated 10 Jan 2010
8
79th
Intriguing to no end. Some real opinions are presented now. "The Up Series" concept is a thought provoking look at the social structure.
Rated 22 Oct 2007
60
26th
For me, the least interesting of the series, likely because of the painful and at times crippling self-awareness of the adolescents on the screen.
Rated 06 Mar 2011
60
36th
Slightly better than Seven Up!, but I'm looking forward to the films where there's much more points of reference to contrast the interviews with. Seven Up! got kind of boring since you were just talking to children. 7 Plus Seven is slightly more interesting, but I mean you're still just talking to teenagers. It can only get better from here, once we have more than one film to look back on.
Rated 20 Apr 2009
81
69th
Fascinating glimpse into those original kids who are now awkward little teenagers who definitely don't smile as much as they did when they were 7. I love that they have to watch clips of themselves at 7 and reassess their viewpoints.
Rated 24 Apr 2010
76
74th
Missed out on this one on my first Up Series go-round. I figured I wasn't missing much since the flashbacks from 7 Plus Seven were few and far between, but it seems I've been happily mistaken. It's not as quotable as the first installment, but its content is the whole point of the project. Watching real people evolve like this is very fascinating.
Rated 26 Jul 2011
50
44th
I feel that neither the kids nor the films have gained enough perspective at this point to be really meaningful. However, I see where the series is going, and I'm looking forward to the rest.
Rated 20 Jun 2010
90
88th
I'm rating all of these a 90 because I see the experiment as valuable. These are normal people, for the most part, and some are interesting, some are not. Some of them have very bad problems, some don't. The prejudice of the film-maker is obvious, but what captivated me was whether or not we come to know these children, and later adults? I think we do, better than we ever will know Tom Cruise or Lindsay Lohan, no matter how many films they make. For that, for the depth of information, it's a 90.
Rated 21 Mar 2013
70
56th
Better than the first, and a good sign of things to come for when they actually hit adulthood. It will make the first two films much more interesting to look back on.
Rated 14 Dec 2010
30
78th
"The flashbacking technique employed throughout the Up series is part of each film's dialectic approach and is alternately compelling and cumbersome." - Ed Gonzalez
Rated 26 Nov 2009
72
54th
It was a good documentry, and the next few in the series should be interesting.
Rated 14 Aug 2007
65
71st
While this instalment was both interesting and well done, I have found this series less and less appealing as time has progressed. The initial concept seems somewhat to have been sacrificed, and the longer it goes on, the more it becomes a soap opera involving real lives. Summary of scores: 21 (60); 28 UP (55); 35 UP (50); 42 UP (45); 49 UP (40). Also, cf., my review of 49 UP.
Rated 05 Aug 2013
65
27th
No one has anything interesting or even mildly entertaining to say when they're 14.
Rated 21 Feb 2010
70
64th
By the second installment, I've already come to realize that the whole will be greater than the sum of its parts in Michael Apted's Up series. Taken individually, each installment doesn't offer much, but the totality of the experiment is gratifying in a way few films are.
Rated 27 Oct 2012
76
57th
At only fourteen years old these kids still have ill informed opinions and have yet to make any real life decisions. It's interesting to see them take a step in growing up, but this only promises more interesting changes in the future.
Rated 01 Oct 2009
81
64th
Occasionally unfocused but a very interesting glimpse at adolescence. At times it does feel like the editing is constructed to make certain contrasts stand out, but on the whole it feels rather honest and provides a lot of food for thought about both youth and class issues.

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