Room 666
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Room 666

1982
Documentary
TV Movie
45m
During the 1982 Cannes Film Festival, Wenders asks a number of film directors from around the world to get, each one at a time, into a hotel room, turn on the camera and sound recorder, and, in solitude, answer a simple question: "What is the future of cinema?". (imdb)
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Room 666

1982
Documentary
TV Movie
45m
Your probable score
Avg Percentile 38.2% from 145 total ratings

Ratings & Reviews

(145)
Compact view
Compact view
Rated 07 Jun 2011
70
58th
In some ways its disappointing how short this is, both with the entire film and some of the directors' segments, and yet there is enough in this to show a mirror to the period and still raise relevant issues about cinema now. Even the very brief segments provoke ideas, although it is Hellman, Godard, Herzog (who is the only person who turns off the TV strategically placed within camera frame), Antonioni, Morrissey and Spielberg who intrigued the most with their views.
Rated 13 Oct 2010
2
39th
Interesting time capsule, nicely tied together by Wenders.
Rated 22 Nov 2013
2
13th
Herzog's response is great. Fassbinder's response is pleasant and extremely brief. Most everyone else I can take or leave, either because they were indulgent, meandering, or apathetic. Spielberg's response was astute, yet it's sad to see him claim the problems within the film industry revolve around people with money wanting grand slams that please everyone when that is quite literally the definition of his career. I got a kick out of the "Cinema will surely be dead soon" responses.
Rated 20 Jan 2013
35
8th
Despite the low score the start of Herzog's section was awesome.
Rated 04 Nov 2010
10
1st
There's only one word for this kind of film. Indulgent. I mean, I guess another word would be masturbation. Two more might be self-gratification. This type of introspection is incredibly pretentious, and doesn't really add anything useful to the cultural conversation. Everybody seems to speak with authority, but they're also utterly clueless. Nobody knows. The only people who are going to get their kicks from this movie are people who already share its worldview. Where's the fun in that?
Rated 19 Feb 2024
40
19th
Antonioni has some prescient commentary, and the final piece touches on important information. Suture Self has said the rest. Herzog's segment made me think of the pencil scene with Will Smith in MiB. It's kind of astonishing that you could get all of these people in a room (alone) and still end up with a mostly wasted 40 minute piece.
Rated 18 Feb 2020
66
37th
Fassbinder died a month after this was made. He never got to see the future he predicted
Rated 29 Jan 2024
60
49th
Not as engrossing as I thought it would be -- most interviews are just too brief or the filmmaker is not interested in talking at all --, but there are some gems here, like Antonioni's optimism, Godard's mysterious, kinda sinister way to say what he thinks and Herzog turning off the television and taking off his shoes before his contribution.
Rated 03 May 2024
7
60th
everyone's just as you would expect them to be
Rated 08 Jun 2024
57
37th
As a "documentary," there isn't much to it, but it's interesting as a time-capsule piece concerning the fears and worries of filmmakers from all around the world circa 1982, principally in regards to the changing economics of filmmaking and the perceived takeover of television replacing cinema. It would be interesting to see Wim Wenders make an updated version of this for the current state of cinema.

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