Wings of Hope
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Wings of Hope

2000
Documentary
TV Movie
1h 5m
Werner Herzog returns to the South American jungle with Juliane Koepcke, the German woman who was the sole survivor of a plane crash there in 1972... (imdb)
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Wings of Hope

2000
Documentary
TV Movie
1h 5m
Your probable score
Avg Percentile 71.14% from 139 total ratings

Ratings & Reviews

(139)
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Rated 13 May 2010
90
85th
The story of Juliane Koepcke is one of those amazing tales of survival: a 17 year old girl -- the lone survivor of a plane crash in the middle of the Peruvian jungle -- manages to walk her way back to civilization, against all the odds. One can hardly go through something like what Juliane experienced without being deeply marked by it, and she clearly is, but at the same time she seems to accept the hand she was dealt with a matter-of-factly, almost stereotypical German stoicism.
Rated 31 Mar 2013
80
85th
Werner Herzog could make a movie about a woman speculating to the audience about what certain pieces of jungle-claimed rubble could be, and it would still be awesome. Oh wait...
Rated 15 Dec 2008
85
93rd
Great photography, interesting subject matter on and off topic, some unforgettable shots and fascinating information. All done in typical Herzog style. Terrific!
Rated 25 Apr 2010
90
95th
An interesting subject, and a great film. That Juliane survived the plane crash was a miracle enough. That she survived 10 days of travel in a Peruvian jungle with a broken collar bone, swollen eyes, and a single shoe having essentially nothing to eat is amazing. Even more so that having done this she later had the strength to go on to a PhD in biology, and to survive going back to the crash site and digging around. It's also fascinating that Werner Herzog himself nearly boarded the same plane.
Rated 16 Nov 2011
71
62nd
Herzog makes a documentary on the human spirit trapped in a jungle. He's done it before. He'll do it again. He'll continue to be good at it.
Rated 16 Aug 2011
87
89th
Another remarkable Herzog doc, about Juliane Koepcke, the 17 year-old sole survivor of a 1971 plane crash in the Peruvian jungle. The tale has many fascinating elements, not the least of which is the fact that Herzog himself was almost on that flight. The film contains the usual enigmatic Herzogian touches like his poetic narration and strange detours. One of my favorite moments was actually one of the least relevant: a minute is taken to film a young girl delighted with the camera.
Rated 11 Apr 2012
85
86th
'Zogtastic! Juliane Koepcke is one bad B.
Rated 06 Nov 2013
80
69th
Herzog's emotional narrative feels a little intrusive considering his seemingly level-headed, rational subject, but it's doesn't detract much from the quality of the film.
Rated 08 Jun 2020
70
74th
Perhaps there is nothing more Herzogian than asking a survivor of a place crash about the crash while travelling in a plane (retracing the flight). But, again, as this is Herzog, this is done with the utmost compassion and a genuine desire to re-enact tragedy for the purposes of therapy (in this case for Juliane Koepcke). Herzog's personal link to the disaster - he was almost on the flight - adds to the sincerity of the film. It really is a remarkable story.
Rated 21 Apr 2022
71
47th
Know that if you ever crash a plane in the jungle, Herzog will make you walk your ass back to it. Like with Dieter Dengler, the subject here is impenetrably cool-headed and detached from the incident, narrating more like a tour guide than a traumatized survivor. Some people are just tough to rattle.
Rated 26 Sep 2011
70
26th
The unbreakable stoicism of Koepce makes this a surprisingly boring story of otherwise amazing survival.
Rated 15 Jun 2013
83
72nd
Reminded me a lot of Little Dieter Needs to Fly, only this one grabbed me a bit more. Koepcke's story really is fascinating. Her description of the crash itself was incredible, as was the discovery of the wrecked airplane parts. What really got me was her calm, unemotional countenance as she relived her experience. It's hard to tell if she's forcing herself to remain disconnected or if she really is numb to it all. Either way it's strange.
Rated 02 Jun 2016
80
76th
At the expense of a cheap reconstruction, Herzog escorts Juliane back to the original location of the event, and it's here that she narrates her story. Juliane even disinters previously untouched remnants of her plane crash; veering between distant pragmatism and quiet introspection. Both Wings of Hope and Little Dieter Needs to Fly are really compelling, and I found myself being distracted from their faces and the backdrops by my own imagination, which I think is a testament to this.
Rated 12 May 2013
73
79th
Inferior to "Little Dieter Needs to Fly", but definitely a great documentary about one person's survival against all odds. In every scene we are struck by Herzog's love of life and nature and fascination with the perserverence of the human spirit under extreme duress, and our appreciation for Juliane, his subject, grows ever more.
Rated 09 Mar 2021
80
66th
Not sure what Germans are doing in Peru, but this was more interesting than it should have been, as usual, thanks to Werner Herzog.
Rated 14 Feb 2020
81
73rd
One of his most interesting documentaries, focusing on his most badass subject.
Rated 11 Nov 2017
55
49th
Not bad.
Rated 15 Feb 2014
80
89th
What an incredible story. Juliane has a mind of steel.
Rated 29 Dec 2013
70
56th
Typical Herzog documentary about an incredibly badass girl. I was waiting for Herzog to go crazy with epic, overlong shots of nature mixed in between the regular shots, but I never got what I was hoping for. I also prefer him speaking english with a thick german accent instead of just boring old german.
Rated 25 Mar 2012
9
90th
Juliane Koepcke is a much better human than I will ever be.
Rated 19 Aug 2009
81
33rd
Amazing story which didn't benefit much from the film treatment. All in all, it serves to show how Juliane Koepcke is one of the most stoic survivors ever.

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