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Where to Invade Next

Where to Invade Next

2015
Documentary
2h 0m
The United States' long history of invading countries and pushing agendas has produced results that are, to say the least, mixed. What if the US could do a better job at invading? That's the premise for this film, which sends Moore on an epic journey. (tiff.net)
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Where to Invade Next

2015
Documentary
2h 0m
Your probable score
Avg Percentile 53.49% from 374 total ratings

Ratings & Reviews

(374)
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Rated 19 Feb 2017
67
57th
Sort of an expansion of the full spectrum that Sicko touched on internationally with health care. It feels scattershot and is not his best work by any means. It's still anecdotally interesting at how much we grasp onto the idea that low taxes balances out paying massive amounts out of pocket for services.
Rated 30 Apr 2016
75
93rd
It's weird that I enjoy Moore's documentaries as much as I do, considering I'm as far removed from being a left wing activist as possible (which is what Moore is) While his material is cherry picking at it's finest, there's always a positive endeavor to his agenda, whether it's fixing a broken system or shedding light on perceived injustices. Depending on your intellect level, his films are either propaganda bullshit or conversation pieces. I say drop the nukes already and start over.
Rated 29 Apr 2016
60
34th
*Your butchy aunt Michael throws scraps of paper he has written ideas on in the air* "This will be my movie"
Rated 08 Apr 2016
16
0th
A well-intended piece of propaganda shit, and unfunny to boot. Nothing wrong with anti-Americanism, but Moore presents a highly biased viewpoint that does not consider any factors, and bases most of it on anecdotal evidence and hardly reports to (peer-reviewed) statistics. He also fits in a few conspiracies, but only backs them up with nothing but mobile-phone footage. In conclusion, the solution to America's woes are apparently a) more women in power (just 'cause) and b) break shit. Fuck off.
Rated 04 Mar 2016
95
91st
It's nice to see Michael Moore having fun by being the optimistic wiseass he once was! This film is intriguing for an election year, as it makes two points on what can save America: a Scandinavian style social democracy or a woman. He gets some good inappropriate laughs--especially with the French school cafeteria kids. But he goes 180 & gets the deepest, most profound interviews when talking to a father of a mass shooting victim. Watch it with someone you love to have deep conversations with!
Rated 11 Mar 2016
83
75th
Michael Moore is a funny man. His editing is unmatched. Sometimes the Amercian in him gets the better of him and he has to state the obvious. And still this is one of his best films because he is always aware and plain about his goals. "Every country has it's problems but I'm here to pick the flowers not the weed." That sums it up. And if you hold him to another standard it's your problem and you may miss out on intersting people who offer exciting stories and intriguing approaches
Rated 21 Apr 2017
86
81st
Seen 2x
Rated 23 Feb 2016
80
51st
Michael Moore, ostensibly on assignment for the Joint Chiefs, travels to various countries, mostly in Europe, to collect ideas and practices which could better America. As with the rest of Moore's work, it must be taken with a grain of salt; he himself admits he is focusing on the positives of each situation. But if Moore's style is to your taste, you'll probably enjoy it quite a bit and wish some of these ideas COULD make it over here. As a film, it's just a touch sluggish at times.
Rated 28 Apr 2016
50
77th
As if Americans want to hear about how great we have it here in Europe....
Rated 23 Feb 2016
69
73rd
More selective in truth than ever but often charming and sometimes even touching. Shame that the premise and title is wrong. It's not about invasion at all but about borrowing ideas from other countries.
Rated 13 May 2016
5
0th
Michael Moore--still a deliberately obtuse fatass who treats everyone that enters his egoic sphere as if they are a special needs child. During the Finland segment I cringed so hard that I was on the verge of a panic attack. Almost all of his arguments are supported by anecdotes from interviewees that he treats as props rather than rational agents. He shows up, extracts the sound-byte that he needs, then leaves, while the interviewee looks around and wonders what the fuck just happened.
Rated 23 Jul 2017
38
4th
As a potential pilot for a TV series, W.T.I.N could have been an appealing appetiser for an extensive cross-country investigation into different cultural practices in key areas such as education, health, incarceration and women's rights. But Moore's only interest here is to shame Americans by comparing them to nations that perform better in a few major areas, offering little but smug condescension in place of genuine insight. It's ego-driven flatulence from the world's laziest showbiz liberal.
Rated 02 Jun 2016
8
70th
good movie. his reactions were funny. Italy isn't that great, but the movie wanted to prove a larger point. the bit about women being inherently better was a bit awkward. women in power in itself won't save the world. equality will
Rated 16 Jun 2016
65
54th
Regardless of how you feel about his politics and ideas, it's hard to deny how good Moore is at making smart and entertaining documentary films. And I quite liked this one, too. It may not be up there with his best, but it's still thought-provoking and funny stuff. I sort of get why a lot of people don't like Moore, but he makes a lot of valid points in this film, and I definitely think people, and Americans in particular, should see it.
Rated 06 Oct 2018
96
92nd
Moore's most pragmatic and level headed film to date eschews the familiar (and often off-putting) grandstanding from previous films in favour of an apparently genuine and sincere attempt to identify problematic elements of American culture, using uncomfortable truths that also translate effectively to other countries. While blatantly 'picking the flowers and leaving the weeds', Moore still constructs a compelling, moving and poignant reflection on some possible solutions to undeniable problems.
Rated 17 Dec 2016
100
98th
Where to invade next manages to be like a heat pack for the anxieties of the modern age. It is uplifting and calming for those fearful for the world, but doesn't flinch away from the problems that face America (and also Australia I can only imagine).
Rated 25 Aug 2016
80
80th
In this film Michael Moore goes to many other countries to find different ideas. The film is interesting and there are some funny moments. There are many interesting ideas in this movie. Overall I would recommend this documentary.
Rated 25 Mar 2017
45
23rd
Never thought how deep I would miss the comedian Michael Moore. This brings often good ideas to the table, but it's just too bad that Moore invests so much in making his vision more of an excuse to complain about things in America than actually understanding other cultures' views. Also, the shallow focus makes this feel like at least three separate documentary features all crammed into one.
Rated 28 Oct 2020
60
7th
Some good ideas but I can't believe it when it shows French kids that don't know what Coca-Cola is (I'm French).
Rated 30 Jul 2017
95
74th
95
Rated 03 Oct 2017
76
46th
However real this documentary is, it does feel a bit one sided towards the end. Though I agree with the viewpoints Moore is getting a crossed, it would be nice to see a look at the negatives we are committing, instead of just seeing other nation's positives.
Rated 22 Jan 2018
90
99th
A true gem and a very rare upbeat documentary about success stories all over the world.
Rated 03 Feb 2024
81
73rd
2024-02-03
Rated 25 May 2023
72
51st
It's easy to paint the picture you want people to see when you cherry-pick the facts that support your hypothesis. The lack of honesty has always been my problem with Moore's "documentaries." Still, there's a lot the U.S. could learn by admitting other countries have some good ideas. It's too bad Moore is simply preaching to the converted here.
Rated 14 Nov 2023
50
35th
eng; [where to invade next]; komödiantische Eroberung der europäischen Staaten um soziale Errungenschaften als Beute in die USA zu bringen.;
Rated 26 Oct 2015
74
36th
Like usual well made and funny but also overly simple and very willing to ignore things that would contradict what it's talking about.
Rated 16 Mar 2017
4
51st
I know it's not really in vogue to like MM if you're anything but a centre left liberal(I'm not), but I really enjoyed this. Like a lot of his docs it glosses over a bunch of points to make his stronger, but he keeps it entertaining. Also, if you think this is anti-American than you're an idiot.
Rated 10 Feb 2017
60
30th
Most important section is clearly the Germany section where they're teaching kids about the holocaust and the city is under constant reminders of their past. Moore ponders why this is not the case in America(Canada also!!) and it's v easy to see why. White people think they aren't a factor in the heinous crimes of their ancestors(they are!). Every other section links to this cuz you could have all these things MM says Europe has but first you have to treat people of colour as fucking HUMANS!
Rated 30 Jan 2017
60
20th
As with most of Moore's documentaries, Where to Invade Next is interesting about 70% of the time and dull the other 30%.
Rated 07 Jan 2017
6
54th
Moore's newfound mellow approach in Where to Invade Next is meant to disarm us. This is Big Mike the entertainer, not the provocateur of cinematic missiles such as Bowling for Columbine, Fahrenheit 9/11 and Sicko. Don't believe it. No laugh in this doc - and there are plenty - goes out without a sting in its tail.
Rated 13 Sep 2016
43
7th
I really hated it when Moore acted as if every country except the US were perfect. I hated it even more when he acknowledged the fact that he is not trying to say that those exemplary countries are perfect... in a sentence or two. I am not even American so I wondered why I felt this way, and in the end I concluded that it was because this movie felt like a compilation of Moore's cry babying.
Rated 19 Aug 2016
81
44th
This is what Moore has been doing for a while: pointing out where other countries are excelling in areas America should be. I have to chuckle at critics who deride Moore's basic arguments that don't flesh out all of the questions he raises, intentionally or not. This is Michael Moore; he's always had a basic argument -- no more, no less. I award points for the entertainment value, which was more than I expected, and Moore's surprising optimism.
Rated 15 Aug 2016
65
43rd
Some witty observations without much substance behind it. The points may have been legit, but each scenario begged many questions that we never got to explore.
Rated 26 Jun 2016
60
40th
Michael Moore always makes movies for the lowest common denominator, aka the Trump crowd. So even though it's hard to take him seriously, I think he does a noble and good job. And this one is no different. Bad sadly, this time the film is very depressing. Not just for Americans but other people too, sure it sugar coats everything and just looks at the very positive side, but still the points made, makes you sad for your own country..
Rated 14 May 2016
67
38th
I sometimes wish the world would be as black and white as Michael Moore makes it to be. But still, the editing is spot on and the interviews are cherry picking enough to shove a specific idea down your throat. I get it, America is so far from its initial ideals that other countries achieved these while they were busy making money. So we have to care about this, the rest of the world?!?
Rated 21 Mar 2016
60
10th
Viewed March 20, 2016.
Rated 07 Mar 2016
70
19th
Für "seriöse" Dokumentarfilmer ist Michael Moore unmöglich. Schliesslich geht es ihm ausschliesslich darum, zu polarisieren. Er ist ein Schwarzweiss-Denker, aber ein unterhaltsamer. Diesmal untersucht er, was die Europäer besser machen als die Amerikaner (Man stelle sich vor!). Wie immer trägt Moore seine Basecap und stellt sich selbst ins Zentrum des Films... mehr auf cinegeek.de
Rated 22 Feb 2016
70
47th
Substance is more important than style. That being said, Where To Invade Next needed lots of improvements in the way it's message was delivered after the German segment.

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